Treatments for H1N1 Redding CA

A plant with a particularly malodorous sap has components that show great efficacy in killing off the H1N1 swine flu virus, Chinese scientists report. The plant, Ferula assa-foetida, grows throughout Iran, Afghanistan and mainland China, and is commonly dubbed "Dung of the Devil" due to its ill-smelling sap.

Gisela C Okonski, MD
(530) 244-3278
1355 East St
Redding, CA
Business
Northern Heart & Vascular
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Dr. Michael Young
(530) 222-1233
841 Hartnell Avenue Suite B
Redding, CA

Data Provided by:
Werawoot Patrasirikul, MD
(530) 246-3857
1158 N Court St
Redding, CA
Specialties
General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Chiang Mai Univ, Fac Of Med, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Graduation Year: 1970

Data Provided by:
Karin Young
(530) 246-5710
1035 Placer St
Redding, CA
Specialty
Family Practice, Emergency Medicine

Data Provided by:
Jolene Angel Kingsley
(530) 246-5710
1035 Placer St
Redding, CA
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Westside Pet Hospital
(530) 243-3610
1825 Buenaventura Blvd
Redding, CA

Data Provided by:
Carlota Cruz Nepomuceno
(530) 244-1003
1441 Liberty St
Redding, CA
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Matthew J Peltz
(530) 229-1310
1832 Buenaventura Blvd
Redding, CA
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Gurpreet Kaur Singh
(530) 243-1414
2110 Railroad Ave
Redding, CA
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Michael Lloyd Farley
(530) 229-9300
1441 Liberty St
Redding, CA
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Treatments for H1N1

Provided By:

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A plant with a particularly malodorous sap has components that show great efficacy in killing off the H1N1 swine flu virus, Chinese scientists report.

The plant, Ferula assa-foetida, grows throughout Iran, Afghanistan and mainland China, and is commonly dubbed "Dung of the Devil" due to its ill-smelling sap. But the researchers note that the plant was used in China against the influenza virus during the great 1918 Spanish flu epidemic, which is thought to have killed tens of millions worldwide. But until now no one has confirmed that Ferula assa-foetida has natural antiviral properties, according to a news release from the American Chemical Society.

The report appears in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of Natural Products.

In their laboratory experiments, researchers Fang-Rong Chang, Yang-Chang Wu and colleagues identified a group of chemicals in the plant's extracts that appear to have a stronger potency against H1N1 flu than a prescription antiviral medication already in use against the flu. They write that these compounds "may serve as promising lead components for new drug development against influenza A (H1N1) viral infection."

More information

Find out more about the H1N1 virus at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, Sept. 9, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com